MEDIA NEWS & RESOURCES HOME · ABOUT · CONTACT · PRESS · LEGAL 



JOBS

PUBLICATIONS

BOOKS

ORGANIZATIONS

NEWS

RESOURCES

INTERVIEWS

PERSON OF THE YEAR

FUTURE OF MEDIA





SEARCH WWW
SEARCH SITE

   

   

   

   

   

2011 Media Person of the Year:
Steve Jobs


The man who created new hope for old media is named the year's most noteworthy media figure.


Steve Jobs, the Apple co-founder who introduced the revolutionary iPod, iPad and iPhone to the world, is the 2011 Media Person of the Year, according to the 10th annual online contest held by I Want Media.

Visitors to I Want Media suggested several candidates for the week-long Internet-based competition to the name the year's "most memorable" figure in the media industry.

Jobs clearly was the most popular figure, capturing some 42% of the vote. The first runner-up, at 18%, was the scandal-plagued media mogul Rupert Murdoch. The Media Person of the Year recipient last year was WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who followed the Twitter guys in 2009.


2010: JULIAN ASSANGE

2009: TWITTER GUYS

2008: ARIANNA HUFFINGTON

2007: WRITERS ON STRIKE

2006: STEPHEN COLBERT

2005: ANDERSON COOPER

2004: JON STEWART

2003: BONNIE FULLER

2002: MARTHA STEWART
The late Apple guru also a contender for Time magazine's 2011 Person of the Year was a creative titan on a par with the likes of Walt Disney and Pablo Picasso, according to Walter Isaacson, author of the best-selling biography "Steve Jobs." "The real genius of these men was that they were able to create an emotional connection with their products."

Moreover, Jobs was able to create hope among traditional media that they could open a "new revenue spigot" from his company's gadgets and services amid the many challenges of the digital age. While his relationship with the media industries was sometimes contentious, Jobs moved media companies towards the inevitable, observers said. "He forced the issue of changing media business models to accommodate consumer desire."

Disney CEO Bob Iger recalled: "He would call me on Saturday afternoons and we'd chat for an hour. We had great talks about the future of digital media. It was never about the distribution mechanism. It was, 'What will people want?' "

This year's finalists:


JILL ABRAMSON. She appeared only in the background in the new "Page One: Inside The New York Times" documentary. But Abramson enjoyed a bigger star turn off screen with her appointment as the Gray Lady's first-ever top woman editor. Abramson "arguably the most powerful woman in journalism" said she plans to improve the newspaper's digital strategy, as the Times launched its much-watched online paywall this year.





GLENN BECK. Will the former Fox News pundit become the Oprah of the Internet? Beck forged a new path in the media biz this year with his plan to take his popular TV show and turn it into the basis of a subscription-based Internet network. "I don't know anybody under 30 who is watching television," declared the conservative firebrand, who now runs the upstart GBTV. Traditional TV networks, he asserted, "are a thing of the past."





ARIANNA HUFFINGTON. The 2008 Media Person of the Year honoree had another big year in 2011: She sold the Huffington Post to AOL, saw her site pass the New York Times in online traffic, and exported her "Internet newspaper" to more international markets. Her sway at AOL raised the question: Who is really the top dog Huffington or CEO Tim Armstrong? While stirring protests, she "refashioned the paradigm of the media tycoon."





STEVE JOBS. Apple's co-founder was more than just the man who introduced the iPod, iPhone and iPad he challenged all areas of the media business to "think different." His death led to the production of even more media, in the form of magazine specials, e-books, TV tributes, and a big biography by Walter Isaacson. Among his triumphs: "He forced the issue of changing media business models to accommodate consumer desire."





PIERS MORGAN. Some people on the west side of the Atlantic had not even heard of this former British tabloid editor when he took over the coveted CNN talk-show time slot occupied by the retiring Larry King. Despite the achievement, Morgan reportedly still "has nightmares" about his former boss and Media Person of the Year rival Rupert Murdoch. CNN pal Anderson Cooper took home the honor in 2005 Maybe 2011 will be Piers' year.





RUPERT MURDOCH. Who in the media biz had a more critical 2011? News Corp.'s 80-year-old CEO launched an iPad "newspaper," bought his daughter's TV-production firm, and sold off his floundering Myspace website. And then came the explosion of the massive phone-hacking scandal in Britain. Unfortunately, when Murdoch said, "This is the most humble day of my life," he wasn't referring to his Media Person of the Year nomination.





JIM ROMENESKO. "He was an aggregator before it became a dirty word." Romenesko, the pioneering blogger covering news about the news, resigned from his longtime Poynter Institute home, amid a flap about attribution. The abrupt exit saddened many in the media biz. Admired for "opening a hole in the sacred wall between news and gossip in reporting about the media," Romenesko quickly resurfaced with another media blog.





CHARLIE SHEEN. TV's highest-paid star was fired from the top-rated "Two and a Half Men," after denouncing the show's creator, even though his absence could have cost two media giants CBS and Warner Bros. "tens of millions" of dollars. The tiger-blood-fueled actor walked away with a big settlement, became a social media celeb, and signed up for a new TV series. But will he be "duh, winning" Media Person of the Year?





OPRAH WINFREY. The Queen of All Media brought the curtain down on her beloved talk show and, in no small feat, launched her own cable TV network. Alas, OWN has struggled to find an audience, leading some to suggest that the fabled Oprah brand had "weakened." Still, she took home an honorary Oscar for her charity work. Plus, observers continued to crow that Winfrey "understands the power of television better than anyone."





MARK ZUCKERBERG. Facebook's co-creator unveiled a new version of his social network, offering tools for sharing news and entertainment, which he claimed would "transform" the media biz. With access to 800 million+ people, Zuck came to possess a massive trove of consumer data. Forbes declared that he was "more powerful" than many world leaders as well as fellow Media Person nominees Jill Abramson and Rupert Murdoch.







 

HOME · ABOUT · CONTACT · PRESS · LEGAL 

Copyright 2000-2011 I Want Media Inc. All rights reserved.